SEER Inquiry System - View

Question: 20130068 Status
Final

References
Source 1:   Heme & Lymph Manual & DB
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Notes:  
Source 2:  
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Notes:  


Question
Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is polycythemia, NOS reportable? See Discussion.

Discussion
The physician states the patient has polycythemia. There is no confirmation of primary polycythemia nor is there mention of polycythemia vera. JAK2 was negative.

Answer
For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

Polycythemia, NOS is not reportable. Polycythemia, NOS is not a synonym for polycythemia vera and, therefore, is not reportable. To be reportable the diagnosis must be polycythemia vera, or one of the other terms listed in the Alternate Names section of the Heme DB.

Polycythemia (also known as erythrocytosis) is a disease state in which the proportion of blood volume that is occupied by red blood cells increases. Blood volume proportions can be measured as a hematocrit level. It can be due to an increase in the mass of red blood cells ("absolute polycythemia"); or to a decrease in the volume of plasma ("relative polycythemia").

SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

History
This SINQ question has been updated to the Hematopoietic & Lymphoid Neoplasm Manual & Database published January 2014. The original answer below was written based on the rules in 2012 No, this case is not reportable. Polycythemia (also known as polycythemia or erythrocytosis) is a disease state in which the proportion of blood volume that is occupied by red blood cells increases. Blood volume proportions can be measured as hematocrit level. It can be due to an increase in the mass of red blood cells; "absolute polycythemia"; or to a decrease in the volume of plasma ("relative polycythemia").

To be reportable the diagnosis must be polycythemia vera, or some of the other alternate names listed in the 2012 database.

Last Updated
07/02/2014

Date Finalized
07/11/2013