Policy for Calculating Hispanic Mortality for 1990+ Data

There are years for which the mortality data for a specific state may include a large number of individuals with unknown origin/ethnicity (Hispanic/non-Hispanic/Unknown). Calculation of statistics for Hispanics and non-Hispanics for these years should exclude such states.

The following index is used to determine when the number of deaths with unknown origin/ethnicity, within a state, is high enough that resulting statistics for Hispanics and non-Hispanics are deemed unreliable. Count data used in calculating the index includes deaths from all causes for all ages and genders.

Hispanic Index = [Hispanic Population / Total Population] x Unknown Origin Count  x 100
Hispanic Count

When this index gives a value >= 10.00, data on Hispanic and non-Hispanic mortality are deemed unreliable.

Hispanic Index and Data Usage

A table has been developed that shows the Hispanic Index for each state for each year. When the index >= 10.00 the entry will be darkened and marked with a footnote indicator. The footnote will say: Data on Hispanic and non-Hispanic mortality may be unreliable for this year and the user is cautioned against drawing conclusions from such data. This was based on the value of the Hispanic Index (formula, link (or reference) to the table).

Statistics for the United States should not include regions/states with a value of the Hispanic Index 10.00 for any one year covered by the statistic. These exclusions should be indicated with a footnote including an explanation, formula and link (or reference) to the table as described above.

Hispanic Index Tables

SEER Cancer Statistics Review

The SEER Cancer Statistics Review does not include data from any state for which the Hispanic Index is >= 10.00 for any year included in the statistic. That is, it does not include states that have one or more years with the Hispanic Index >= 10.00 in statistics that span such a year. This is indicated with a footnote including an explanation, the Hispanic Index formula, and a link (or reference) to the Hispanic Index Table.

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