Annual Report to the Nation 2017: Incidence Summary
Incidence = rate of new cases per 100,000

The Report to the Nation has statistics on cancer incidence in the U.S.External Web Site Policy We report incidence rates instead of actual counts to adjust for the increasing population over time.

Between 1999 and 2013, overall cancer incidence rates (new cases of cancer per 100,000 people in the U.S.) continued to decrease among men and remain stable among women.External Web Site Policy Over the last 5 years, the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) for all major sites combined was -2.3% per year for men and 0% per year for women. Because prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men, its decreasing rate of new cases between 1999 and 2013 brought down the overall incidence rate for men.

Similarly, because breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, its slight increase in the rate of new cases brought up the overall incidence rate for women. This resulted in a stable Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) of 0%.

The rate of new cases of cancer Enlarge Image

The image below shows incidence trends from 2009 to 2013 for the most common cancers among men and women. During 2009-2013, 9 of the 17 most common cancers in men showed decreases in incidence, including prostate, colon and rectum, lung and bronchus, larynx, esophagus, bladder, stomach, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and brain and other nervous system.

Eight of the 18 most common cancers in women showed decreases in incidence, including cancers of the colon and rectum, ovary, cervix, lung and bronchus, bladder, stomach, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and brain and other nervous system.

National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends, 1975-2014 Enlarge Image

lung cancer is still the second most common cancer Enlarge Image

Lung cancer is second highest in incidence for both sexes, after breast cancer. Smoke-free policies and increased awareness of the dangers of smoking have led to a 50% decrease in cigarette smoking prevalence in the past 50 years. You can see percentages of American adults who use tobacco in our Cancer Trends Progress Report.

Below are incidence rates for the most common cancers in the U.S. Lung cancer is second highest for both sexes, after prostate cancer in men and breast cancer in women.

national incidence rates for men, 2009-2013 Enlarge Image

national incidence rates for women, 2009-2013 Enlarge Image

Next Section: Mortality