Between 2011 and 2015, overall cancer death rates decreased by an average of 1.8 percent per year for men and an average of 1.4 percent per year for women.

Twelve of the 18 more common cancers in men showed decreases in mortality, including leukemia, melanoma, myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, colorectum, esophagus, kidney, larynx, lung and bronchus, prostate, and stomach. Lung and bronchus cancer had the greatest decrease in mortality. Non-melanoma skin cancer and cancers of the brain, liver, oral cavity, pancreas, and soft tissue including heart showed increases in mortality for men between 2011 and 2015, with non-melanoma skin cancer having the greatest increase.

Fourteen of the 20 more common cancers in women showed decreases in mortality, including leukemia, melanoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, breast, cervix, colorectum, esophagus, gallbladder, kidney, lung and bronchus, oral cavity, ovary, and stomach. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma had the greatest decrease in mortality. Myeloma and cancers of the brain, corpus and uterus, liver, pancreas, and soft tissue including heart showed increases in mortality for women between 2011 and 2015, with liver cancer having the greatest increase.

Between 2011 and 2015, overall cancer death rates decreased by an average of 1.8 percent per year for men and an average of 1.4 percent per year for women