Annual Report to the Nation 2017: Survival Infographic

Similar to the previous graph of changes in 5-year survival by race, the graphs below include the top 20 most common cancer types in the U.S. They are listed in order from most to least common. Survival rates increased between 1975 and 2012 for almost all cancer sites. Despite improvements in survival over time, blacks still had mostly lower rates than whites in both time periods. Prostate cancer had the largest increase in survival for all races, whites, and blacks.

For female breast cancer, survival improved from 74.8% in 1975 to 90.8% in 2012 for all races combined, 75.6% to 92% for whites, and 62.2% to 81.5% for blacks.

For lung and bronchus cancers, survival improved from 12.2% in 1975 to 18.7% in 2012 for all races combined, 12.2% to 19% for whites, and 11.2% to 15.9% for blacks.

For prostate cancer, survival improved from 67.8% in 1975 to 99.3% in 2012 for all races combined, 68.5% to 99.7% for whites, and 60.7% to 97.3% for blacks.

For colon and rectum cancers, survival improved from 49.8% in 1975 to 66.2% in 2012 for all races combined, 50.1% to 67.1% for whites, and 44.6% to 59.1% for blacks.

For bladder cancer, survival improved from 72.3% in 1975 to 78.5% in 2012 for all races combined, 73.3% to 78.9% for whites, and 50.3% to 66.1% for blacks.

For melanoma of the skin, survival improved from 81.9% in 1975 to 93.2% in 2012 for all races combined, 82% to 93.2% for whites, and 56.7% to 69.1% for blacks.

For non-Hodgkin lymphoma, survival improved from 46.5% in 1975 to 72.6% in 2012 for all races combined, 46.8% to 73.6% for whites, and 48.6% to 65.2% for blacks.

For thyroid cancer, survival improved from 92.1% in 1975 to 98.3% in 2012 for all races combined, 91.8% to 98.6% for whites, and 89.8% to 96.8% for blacks.

For kidney and renal pelvis cancers, survival improved from 50.1% in 1975 to 74.7% in 2012 for all races combined, 49.8% to 74.5% for whites, and 48.8% to 75.4% for blacks.

For leukemia, survival improved from 34.2% in 1975 to 62.7% in 2012 for all races combined, 34.6% to 63.5% for whites, and 33.4% to 57.5% for blacks.

For corpus and uterus cancers, survival decreased from 86.9% in 1975 to 83.4% in 2012 for all races combined, 88% to 85.6% for whites, and increased 60% to 65.7% for blacks.

For pancreatic cancer, survival improved from 2.5% in 1975 to 8.5% in 2012 for all races combined, 2.5% to 8.5% for whites, and 2.3% to 8% for blacks.

For liver and intrahepatic bile duct cancers, survival improved from 3.4.% in 1975 to 18.1% in 2012 for all races combined, 3.4% to 17.5% for whites, and 1.8% to 13% for blacks.

For oral cavity and pharynx cancers, survival improved from 52.5% in 1975 to 67% in 2012 for all races combined, 54.1% to 68.7% for whites, and 36% to 47.2% for blacks.

For myeloma, survival improved from 24.6% in 1975 to 50.2% in 2012 for all races combined, 24.1% to 49.8% for whites, and 29.3% to 51.8% for blacks.

For stomach cancer, survival improved from 15.2% in 1975 to 31.1% in 2012 for all races combined, 14.1% to 30.2% for whites, and 16.1% to 30.3% for blacks.

For brain and other nervous system cancers, survival improved from 22.4% in 1975 to 35% in 2012 for all races combined, 21.8% to 33.4% for whites, and 25.4% to 43.7% for blacks.

For ovarian cancer, survival improved from 36% in 1975 to 46.4% in 2012 for all races combined, 35.3% to 46% for whites, and decreased 41.9% to 38.1% for blacks.

For esophageal cancer, survival improved from 5% in 1975 to 20.5% in 2012 for all races combined, 5.5% to 21.7% for whites, and 3.5% to 12.5% for blacks.

For cervical cancer, survival decreased from 69.1% in 1975 to 68.8% in 2012 for all races combined, increased 69.7% to 70.6% for whites, and decreased 64.6% to 58.4% for blacks.