The Annual Report to the Nation has statistics on cancer deaths, new cases (incidence), and survival.External Web Site Policy The report includes long-term trends (since 1999) and short-term trends with the most recent 5 years of data (2011-2015 for mortality; 2010-2014 for incidence). Scroll down to see overall rates as well as rates for the most common cancer types in the US.

Cancer Death Rates

Downward trends in mortality (cancer death rates) are the gold standard for evidence of progress against cancer.External Web Site Policy

Cancer death rates declined for men, women, and children Enlarge Image

From 1999 to 2015, cancer death rates declined for men, women, and children.External Web Site Policy

Overall cancer death rates decreased during 1999-2015 by:

  • An average of 1.8 percent per year for men.
  • An average of 1.4 percent per year for women.

The overall cancer death rate for children ages 0-14 years decreased an average of 1.5 percent per year during 2011-2015.

Between 2011 and 2015, overall cancer death rates decreased by an average of 1.8 percent per year for men and an average of 1.4 percent per year for women Enlarge Image

Between 2011 and 2015, overall cancer death rates decreased by an average of 1.8 percent per year for men and an average of 1.4 percent per year for women.External Web Site Policy

Eleven of the 18 most common cancers in men showed decreases in mortality: leukemia, melanoma, myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and cancers of the colon/rectum, esophagus, kidney, larynx, lung and bronchus, prostate, and stomach. Lung and bronchus cancer had the greatest decrease in mortality. Non-melanoma skin cancer and cancers of the brain and other nervous system, liver, oral cavity and pharynx, pancreas, and soft tissue including heart showed increases in mortality for men between 2011 and 2015, with non-melanoma skin cancer having the greatest increase.

Fourteen of the 20 most common cancers in women showed decreases in mortality, including leukemia, melanoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, breast, cervix, colon/rectum, esophagus, gallbladder, kidney, lung and bronchus, oral cavity and pharynx, ovary, and stomach. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma had the greatest decrease in mortality. Cancers of the brain and other nervous system, uterus, liver, and pancreas showed increases in mortality for women between 2011 and 2015, with liver cancer having the greatest increase.

Researchers believe that rising obesity in the U.S. has contributed to the increasing death rates for endometrial, pancreatic, and liver cancers. Researchers also believe that hepatitis C infection among Baby Boomers has contributed to increasing rates for liver cancer, and that human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has contributed to the increasing rates for oral cavity and pharynx cancers.

Researchers say the decreases in mortality for lung cancer and several other cancer sites are largely due to reduced tobacco use. However, cigarette smoking still accounts for more than 25% of cancer deaths in the US. Improved treatments have also helped lower the death rate for a number of cancers, especially breast, prostate, colorectal, leukemia, and Non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

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New Cancer Cases

Between 1999 and 2014, overall cancer incidence rates (new cases of cancer per 100,000 people in the U.S.) continued to decrease among men and remained stable among women.External Web Site Policy

Because prostate and lung cancers are the most common cancer types among men, their decreasing rates of new cases between 1999 and 2014 brought down the overall incidence rate for men.

Similarly, because breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, its slight increase in the rate of new cases brought up the overall incidence rate for women. This resulted in a stable Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) of 0%.

The rate of new cases of cancer Enlarge Image

Overall cancer incidence rates:

  • Decreased an average of 2.2 percent per year for men (during 1999-2014).
  • Remained stable at 0.0% per year for women (during 1999-2014).

The overall cancer incidence rate for children ages 0-14 years increased an average of 0.8% per year during 2010-2014. Unlike for adults, overall incidence trends for children (increasing or decreasing) varied by racial/ethnic group; overall incidence rates increased in four of the groups, but they were stable among American Indian/Alaska Native children and black children.

Between 2010 and 2014, seven of the 17 most common cancers in men showed decreases in incidence:External Web Site Policy prostate, lung and bronchus, colon/rectum, bladder, esophagus, brain and other nervous system, and larynx. Prostate cancer had the greatest decrease in incidence. Leukemia, melanoma, myeloma, and cancers of the kidney, liver, oral cavity, pancreas, and thyroid in men showed increases in incidence between 2010 and 2014, with liver cancer having the greatest increase. On average, the overall cancer incidence rate in men decreased 2.2 percent per year.

Between 2010 and 2014, seven of the 18 most common cancers in women showed decreases in incidenceExternal Web Site Policy: non-Hodgkin lymphoma, bladder, brain and other nervous system, cervix, colon/rectum, lung and bronchus, and ovary. Colorectal cancer had the greatest decrease in incidence. Leukemia, melanoma, myeloma, and cancers of the breast, uterus, kidney, liver, oral cavity and pharynx, pancreas, and thyroid showed increases in incidence among women between 2010 and 2014. Liver cancer had the greatest increase. The overall cancer incidence rate in women on average did not change year by year between 2010 and 2014.

Between 2010 and 2014, nine of the 17 more common cancers in men showed decreases in incidence Enlarge Image

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Most Common Cancers

The top 5 most common cancer sites in the US are female breast, lung and bronchus, prostate, colorectal, and melanoma of the skin.External Web Site Policy This section highlights trends in new cases, deaths, and survival. Click on Part II for all the statistics on prostate cancer.

  1. Female breast
  2. Lung and bronchus
  3. Prostate
  4. Colorectal
  5. Melanoma of the skin

Female Breast Cancer

Estimated New Cases 2018: 268,670 *

Estimated Deaths 2018: 41,400 *

5 year survival varied by stage at diagnosis from 26.5% (stage IV) to 100% (stage I) for cases diagnosed between 2007 and 2013.

Overall incidence rate increased from 2010-2014:

  • rising for all races
  • highest in whites
  • lowest among Asian or Pacific Islanders

Overall mortality rate decreased from 2011-2015:

  • decreasing for all races except American Indian/Alaskan Natives and API
  • highest in blacks
  • lowest among API

Female breast cancer death rates decreased 1.6% per year in 2011-2015.External Web Site Policy

infographic on breast cancer death rates Enlarge Image

Lung and Bronchus Cancer

Estimated New Cases 2018: 234,030 *

Estimated Deaths 2018: 154,050 *

5 year survival varied by stage at diagnosis from 4.2% (stage IV) to 55.1% (stage I) for cases diagnosed between 2007 and 2013

Overall incidence rate decreased from 2010-2014:

  • declining for all races except American Indian/Alaskan Native men and Asian or Pacific Islander women
  • highest in black men
  • lowest among Hispanic women

Overall mortality rate decreased from 2011-2015:

  • decreasing for both sexes, all races
  • highest in black men
  • lowest in Hispanic women

Colorectal Cancer

Estimated New Cases 2018: 140,250 *

Estimated Deaths 2018: 50,630 *

5 year survival varied by stage at diagnosis from 12.6% (stage IV) to 88.1% (stage I) for cases diagnosed between 2007 and 2013

Overall incidence rate decreased from 2010-2014:

  • declining for all races except Hispanic women
  • highest in black men
  • lowest among Asian or Pacific Islander women

Overall mortality rate decreased from 2011-2015:

  • decreasing for all races except American Indian/Alaskan Native (both sexes)
  • highest in black men
  • lowest in API women

From 1999 to 2015, colorectal cancer mortality rates decreased, largely reflecting improved early detection and more effective treatments.External Web Site Policy

colorectal cancer mortality rates decreased due to early detectiona dn more effective treatments Enlarge Image

Melanoma

Estimated New Cases 2018: 91,270 *

Estimated Deaths 2018: 9,320 *

5 year survival varied by stage at diagnosis from 16% (stage IV) to 100% (stage I) for cases diagnosed between 2007 and 2013

Overall incidence rate increased from 2010-2014:

  • increasing for whites and non-Hispanic (both sexes) and American Indian/Alaskan Native women
  • highest in white men
  • lowest in black women

Overall mortality rate decreased from 2011-2015:

  • decreasing for whites (both sexes), non-Hispanics (both sexes), and black women
  • highest in white men
  • lowest in black and Asian or Pacific Islander women

Finding and treating melanoma at an earlier stage is associated with better survival.External Web Site Policy

detecting melanoma in earlier stage leads to better survival Enlarge Image

For cases diagnosed from 2007 through 2013 at Stage I, here are the 5-year survival rates for the most common cancers:External Web Site Policy

  • The 5-year survival rate for breast cancer diagnosed at Stage 1 was 100 percent for cases diagnosed 2007–2013.
  • The 5-year survival rate for lung and bronchus cancer diagnosed at Stage 1 was 55.1 percent for cases diagnosed 2007–2013.
  • The 5-year survival rate for prostate cancer diagnosed at Stage 1 was 100 percent for cases diagnosed 2007–2013.
  • The 5-year survival rate for colorectal cancer diagnosed at Stage 1 was 88.1 percent for cases diagnosed 2007–2013.
  • The 5-year survival rate for melanoma diagnosed at Stage 1 was 99.5 percent for cases diagnosed 2007–2013.

5-year survival rates between 2007-2013 for stage 1 of the most common cancers Enlarge Image

* References

Next Section: Part II: Prostate Cancer Trends and Disease Characteristics