The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer has statistics on cancer deaths and new cases (incidence).External Web Site Policy The report includes long-term trends (since 2001) and short-term trends with the most recent five years of data (2012-2016 for incidence and 2013-2017 for mortality). For the first time, the Annual Report provides rates and trends for the most common cancers among children (aged 0-14) and adolescents and young adults or AYAs (aged 15-39).

Scroll down to learn more about trends in cancer incidence and mortality rates.

Cancer Death Rates

Downward trends in mortality (cancer death rates) are the gold standard for evidence of progress against cancer.

Adults

Overall, cancer death rates decreased 1.8% per year (on average) among males and 1.4% per year (on average) among females.External Web Site Policy

Cancer death rates declined for men and women Enlarge Image

11 of the 19 most common cancers in men showed decreases in mortality between 2013-2017:External Web Site Policy leukemia, myeloma, melanoma of the skin, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and cancers of the colon/rectum, larynx, lung and bronchus, stomach, urinary bladder, esophagus, and kidney and renal pelvis. Oral cavity and pharynx, soft tissue including heart, brain and other nervous system (ONS), and pancreas showed increases in mortality for men between 2013-2017.

14 of the 20 most common cancers in women showed decreases in mortality:External Web Site Policy leukemia, myeloma, melanoma of the skin, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and cancers of the urinary bladder, breast, cervix, colon/rectum, esophagus, gallbladder, kidney and renal pelvis, lung and bronchus, ovary, and stomach. Melanoma had the greatest decrease in mortality. Uterus, liver, brain and ONS, soft tissue including heart, and pancreas showed increases in mortality for women between 2013-2017.

National Trends in Cancer Death Rates Enlarge Image

Children and AYA

Cancer death rates decreased an average of 1.0% per year among AYAs, and an average of 1.4% per year among children between 2013 and 2017.External Web Site Policy

Between 2013 and 2017, cancer death rates decreased by an average of 1.0 percent per year among AYA, and an average of 1.4 percent per year among children. Enlarge Image

Continued declines in cancer death rates among children likely result from improved treatment.

Rates of New Cancer

Adults

Overall, cancer incidence rates decreased 0.6% on average per year between 2012 and 2016.External Web Site Policy

Between 2011 and 2015, six of the 18 most common cancers in women showed decreases in incidence. Enlarge Image

Incidence rates decreased for five cancers among males between 2012 and 2016: lung and bronchus, larynx, urinary bladder, colon and rectum, and brain and ONS.External Web Site Policy However, incidence rates increased for five cancers: Liver and intrahepatic bile duct, melanoma of the skin, kidney and renal pelvis, oral cavity and pharynx, and pancreas.

Incidence rates decreased for four cancers among females between 2012 and 2016: Ovary, lung and bronchus, urinary bladder, and brain and ONS.External Web Site Policy However, incidence rates increased for 8 of the 18 most common cancers: liver and intrahepatic bile duct, melanoma of the skin, corpus and uterus, myeloma, pancreas, kidney and renal pelvis, breast, and oral cavity and pharynx.

National Trends in Rates of New Cancer Cases Enlarge Image

Children and AYA

Overall cancer incidence rates for AYA aged 15-39 increased an average of 0.9% per year between 2012 and 2016, and an average of 0.8% per year for children during that period.

Among children aged 0-14, the incidence rate for all cancer sites combined was 16.8 cases per 100,000 persons.

The most common cancer types among children included leukemia, brain and other nervous system, and lymphoma, with increasing trends for all three from 2001-2016.

The most common cancer among AYA was female breast cancer, which was highest among black AYA.

Three of the four most common cancer types among AYA (female breast, thyroid, and testis) increased during 2012-2016 but the fourth (lymphoma) decreased.

Factors potentially influencing childhood cancer incidence trends include changes over time in diagnostic technology, disease classification, and registry completeness, as well as changes in risk factors such as increasing maternal age.

Next Page: Special Topic: Healthy People 2020 objectives related to four common cancers (lung, colorectal, female breast, and prostate)