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Report Produced: 12/01/2022 18:08 PM

Report Question ID Question (Ascending) Discussion Answer
20130043 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is reactive plasmacytosis considered a reportable diagnosis that is equivalent to plasmacytoma?

For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

Reactive plasmacytosis is not reportable unless there is another indication of a reportable neoplastic disease. Reactive plasmacytosis is "a well known pathological process described as occurring in a variety of situations including infections, autoimmune disease, diabetes mellitus, sideropenia, liver cirrhosis and neoplastic conditions including leukemia. This process, by definition, is assumed to be a reaction of the immune system to an unknown or poorly defined stimulus." Based on this definition, reactive plasmacytosis is not the same as a plasmacytoma, although it may indicate the presence of a neoplastic process, such as leukemia.

SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

20130178 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is refractory iron deficiency anemia reportable? Per Appendix F, refractory iron deficiency anemia is not reportable. It is not a clonal disorder and, therefore, is not malignant. Refractory iron deficiency anemia is a condition that is unresponsive to oral iron treatment.
20130125 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) of the skin reportable?

For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

This is a reportable primary. Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) [9751/3] is a reportable neoplasm.

The term "self-healing" means that the neoplasm regressed without treatment. This is a known phenomenon.

SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

20110144 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is steroid resistant idiopathic thrombocytic purpura (ITP) the same as refractory thrombocytopenia [9992/3]?

For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

Idiopathic thrombocytic purpura (ITP) is not a synonym for refractory thrombocytopenia (RT). ITP is not a reportable disease. See Appendix F.

Under the Alternate Names section in the Heme DB, the only synonym for refractory thrombocytopenia is "RT." ITP is not listed as a synonym for refractory thrombocytopenia.

SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

20110142 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is the pathologic final diagnosis of "follicular lymphoma, WHO grade 1-2, findings may represent in situ follicular lymphoma" considered reportable if the clinician also states this may be an "in situ follicular lymphoma"? See Discussion.

2/16/11 mesentery biopsy showed "follicular lymphoma, WHO grade 1-2, findings may represent an "in situ" follicular lymphoma."

3/7/11 clinician note stated, "nodularity of the mesentery which upon biopsy may be in situ follicular lymphoma. No treatment is necessary. This is not a proven malignancy. It may evolve into one. Plan 6 month follow-up and CT scans.

Do the notes from the oncologist and pathologist stating that this "may be" or "may represent" an in situ lymphoma make this case non-reportable?

For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

This case should not be accessioned. In situ lymphoma is not reportable for any of the standard setters (CoC, NPCR, or SEER). In the Case Reportability Instructions, the NOTE under Rule 3 states, "Do report in situ (/2) lymphomas."

SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

20100080 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is the term "thrombocytopenia" equivalent to the term "refractory thrombocytopenia" that should be considered a subsequent primary if it follows a treated diagnosis of pancreatic cancer?

For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

Thrombocytopenia NOS is not a reportable diagnosis per Appendix F. Thrombocytopenia and Refractory Thrombocytopenia are not the same disease.

Thrombocytopenia is caused by a decreased number of platelets in the blood. Non-malignant causes include disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), drug-induced non-immune thrombocytopenia, drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia, hypersplenism, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, and infections of the bone marrow.

SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

20120040 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is the term myelodysplastic disorder a reportable term?

For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

Myelodysplastic disorder is a synonym for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). If no further workup is done or no additional information can be found, code the histology of myelodysplastic disorder to 9989/3 [MDS] for cases diagnosed 1/1/2010 and later.

Refer to the Abstractor Notes section in the Heme DB, Abstractor Notes for MDS. Myelodysplastic (disorder) syndrome is a NOS term. Usually when this diagnosis is made, the physician will conduct further tests to determine a more specific disease in the Myeloproliferative Neoplasms group. Other specific histologies include: refractory anemia with unilineage dysplasia, refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts, refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, refractory anemia with excess blasts, myelodysplastic syndrome with del(5q), childhood myelodysplastic syndrome. If a more specific disease is diagnosed, code to that specific neoplasm.

SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

20120013 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Should a 2011 diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis be accessioned as a reportable case if the patient had a disease free interval between the 2011 diagnosis and when the patient was initially diagnosed with Langerhans cell histiocytosis prior to 2010? See Discussion. The patient was diagnosed with Langerhans cell histiocytosis as a child when the disease was not reportable [9751/1]. The patient was disease free until a recurrence in 2011. Langerhans cell histiocytosis is considered reportable if diagnosed 1/1/2010 and later [9751/3]. The Heme Manual states this is a single primary, but the behavior has changed from borderline to malignant since the initial diagnosis.

For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

Do not accession the 2011 diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. In the Abstractor Notes section of the Heme DB is indicates this is reportable for cases diagnosed 2010 and later. However, this patient was initially diagnosed prior to 2010 when it was not considered a reportable disease process.

The histology code for Langerhans cell histiocytosis has not changed over time. The histology code for cases of Langerhans cell histiocytosis diagnosed prior to 2010 was also 9751 per the ICD-O-3. The only change since 2010 was in the behavior code for this disease. It changed from borderline [/1] to malignant [/3]. The current disease represents a recurrence of the previous Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Per the Multiple Primary rules, Rule M2, a single histology is a single primary. The original diagnosis was made before the disease was considered reportable; do not report the disease recurrence or progression as a new primary.

SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

20130127 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: When did smoldering myeloma become reportable?

For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

Smoldering multiple myeloma [9732/3] has always been a reportable neoplasm. Per the Abstractor Notes section in the Heme, smoldering multiple myeloma is a variant of multiple myeloma in which the diagnostic requirements for multiple myeloma are met, but there is no organ damage. The patient is usually asymptomatic.

Smoldering myeloma is listed under the Alternate Names section in the Heme DB for multiple myeloma [9732/3] to clarify that it is a reportable neoplasm.

Report all new diagnoses of smoldering multiple myeloma now. Registries are not required to spend time and effort to find these cases if they have not been reporting them in the past. However, report earlier earlier cases if encountered today while performing casefinding or chart review procedures.

SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

20130119 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Would this case be reportable? Patient with a myelodysplastic syndrome secondary to a copper deficiency. Myelodysplastic syndrome is a reportable disease. Document in the text that the MDS was due to a copper deficiency.