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Report Produced: 12/02/2022 22:18 PM

Report Question ID Question (Ascending) Discussion Answer
20130015 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is essential thrombocytopenia reportable? See Discussion. Many times essential thrombocytopenia has been coded based on blood counts. Sometimes the discharge summary states thrombocytosis (NOS), and the case is coded to essential thrombocytopenia. Are these cases reportable?

For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

The following are not alternative names for any reportable disease process:

  • Essential thrombocytopenia

  • Reactive thrombocytosis
  • Thrombocythemia
  • Thrombocytopenia
  • Thrombocytosis
  • The diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia is based on blood counts, but is usually a diagnosis made by excluding other myelodysplastic disorders. The following are reportable disease processes:

    • Essential thrombocythemia (9962/3)

  • Essential thrombocytosis (9962/3)
  • Refractory thrombocytopenia (9992/3)
  • SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

    20130042 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is follicular lymphoma in situ reportable? See Discussion.

    Parotid mass and intraparotid lymph node biopsy: Follicular lymphoma in situ (see note).

    Note: The morphologic findings in conjunction with the results of immunohistochemical stains demonstrate focal follicular lymphoma in situ in a background of reactive follicular hyperplasia. Cytogenetic studies on the parotid mass demonstrated a normal karyotype. FISH analysis for BCL2 and BCL6 gene rearrangements has been requested and will be reported separately.

    Per the Note under Case Reportability Instructions Rule 3 in the Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Neoplasm Manual, do not report in situ [/2] lymphomas.
    20100113 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis reportable?

    For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

    No. This is not a reportable hematologic condition. When you do not find a hematologic or lymphoid condition listed in the Heme DB, it is not reportable. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is an uncommon hematologic disorder. The patient usually presents with fever, splenomegaly, and jaundice. Laboratory findings are lymphocytosis and histiocytosis. Pathology findings are hemophagocytosis.

    Appendix F lists this term as non-reportable.

    SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

    20130215 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis synonymous with an EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder in children considered reportable? See Discussion.

    Pathology report states: Prominent T-cell infiltrate with frequent immunoblast-like cells. COMMENT: Findings consistent with an acute EBV-associated hemophagocytic process. In addition, there is a prominent CD8 + T-cell infiltrate with many large, activated forms. This T-cell process may represent an EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder in children.

    EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder in children is listed in the Heme database. However, throughout multiple admissions, the oncologist states the diagnosis as "hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis". Are the two the same condition?

    The patient is being treated with Etoposide.

    Per Appendix F, do not report this case based on the information provided.

    The oncologist likely used the pathology report and clinical factors to determine the diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, which is not reportable. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is caused by an over stimulated immune system (infection, etc.). This clinical syndrome is associated with a variety of underlying conditions. To be reportable, it must state "fulminant hemophagocytic syndrome" (in a child) to be reportable (9724/3).

    The pathology report for this case is not definitive. It states that the process "may" represent the EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder in children.

    Follow back on this case to confirm reportability if possible.

    20110153 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is macrocytic anemia reportable?

    For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

    Macrocytic anemia is not reportable. Anemia refers to a condition of having a low count of red blood cells. The term "macrocytic" refers to the enlarged size of the red blood cells. Macrocytic anemia is usually caused by vitamin deficiencies, alcohol use, medications or thyroid disorders.

    See Appendix F: Non-Reportable List for Hematopoietic Diseases.

    SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

    20130079 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is plasma cell dyscrasia reportable and considered synonymous with multiple myeloma? See Discussion. Bone marrow biopsy and aspirate: Plasma cell dyscrasia with IgG kappa expression with FISH (+) for the following abnormalities: 3 copies of 1q21 (25/30 plasma cells) and an extra CCND1 signal (25/34 plasma cells) which is indicative of the presence of other chromosome 11 abnormalities possibly trisomy 11, a change known to occur in plasma cell neoplasms. Flow cytometry: A monoclonal plasma cell population is present, co-expressing cIgG, cKappa, CD56, & CD117 (up to 14% of analyzed cells).

    For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

    Plasma cell dyscrasia and multiple myeloma are not synonymous terms. Plasma cell dyscrasia is not listed in the Alternate Names section of the Heme DB for plasma cell myeloma (multiple myeloma). Plasma cell dyscrasia is listed in the Alternate Names section of the Heme DB for MGUS [9765/1], which is not a reportable disease.

    Plasma cell dyscrasia (PCD) is not reportable. PCD is a diverse group of neoplastic diseases that produces a serum M component (monoclonal immunoglobulin).

    Usually these patients have a plasma cell morphology such as multiple myeloma or heavy chain disease. However, the registrar cannot diagnose multiple myeloma or heavy chain disease (or any other plasma cell neoplasm). There must be a physician statement and/or a positive biopsy to confirm a reportable diagnosis.

    SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

    20130101 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is plasma cell dyscrasia, favor MGUS vs. smoldering myeloma reportable? See Discussion. The pathology report states, "plasma cell dyscrasia, favor MGUS vs. smoldering myeloma." The patient then died of a heart attack and no further information is available. If this is reportable, what histology code applies?

    For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

    This case is not reportable. Neither plasma cell dyscrasia nor MGUS are reportable. Smoldering myeloma was given as a possible diagnosis, but never confirmed.

    SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

    20130188 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is plasma cell neoplasm reportable? See Discussion. A previously submitted question in 2012 stated this was reportable, but recent answers seem to indicate this is not reportable. Please clarify whether this is reportable or not.

    For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

    Plasma cell neoplasm is not reportable.

    We apologize for the confusion that this has caused. The term "plasma cell neoplasm" was not included in the 2010 Heme DB and Manual. It was added to the 2012 Heme DB and Manual after repeated questions were received regarding this diagnosis. After further investigation, this term is being removed from the Manual and DB.

    According to WHO, 'Plasma cell neoplasm' is an umbrella term that includes MGUS, plasma cell myeloma, solitary plasmacytoma of bone, immunoglobulin deposition diseases, extraosseous plasmacytoma, and osteosclerotic myeloma. Of these, only plasma cell myeloma, solitary plasmacytoma of bone, and extraosseous plasmacytoma are reportable. Physicians may use the term 'plasma cell neoplasm' when they are not sure what the specific disease is. Plasma cell neoplasm is not reportable; however, follow up on these types of patients is recommended because continued evaluation is likely to determine a more specific disease. A reportable neoplasm may be diagnosed at a later date.

    Cases of plasma cell neoplasm diagnosed 2010 or later are not reportable. This change should not have taken place as a result of the update in the 2012 Manual. At this time SEER is not requiring registries to go back and review plasmacytoma or multiple myeloma cases that were collected based on this terminology.

    SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

    20120049 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is polycythemia vera secondary to volume depletion reportable?

    For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

    Secondary polycythemia vera is not reportable. See Appendix F.

    Primary polycythemia vera is a condition in which there is an overproduction of blood cells due to a neoplastic process. Secondary polycythemia vera is an over production of red blood cells caused by a co-morbidity, in this case, volume depletion.

    SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

    20130068 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is polycythemia, NOS reportable? See Discussion. The physician states the patient has polycythemia. There is no confirmation of primary polycythemia nor is there mention of polycythemia vera. JAK2 was negative.

    For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

    Polycythemia, NOS is not reportable. Polycythemia, NOS is not a synonym for polycythemia vera and, therefore, is not reportable. To be reportable the diagnosis must be polycythemia vera, or one of the other terms listed in the Alternate Names section of the Heme DB.

    Polycythemia (also known as erythrocytosis) is a disease state in which the proportion of blood volume that is occupied by red blood cells increases. Blood volume proportions can be measured as a hematocrit level. It can be due to an increase in the mass of red blood cells ("absolute polycythemia"); or to a decrease in the volume of plasma ("relative polycythemia").

    SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.