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Report Produced: 02/04/2023 16:10 PM

Report Question ID Question (Ascending) Discussion Answer
20120040 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Is the term myelodysplastic disorder a reportable term?

For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

Myelodysplastic disorder is a synonym for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). If no further workup is done or no additional information can be found, code the histology of myelodysplastic disorder to 9989/3 [MDS] for cases diagnosed 1/1/2010 and later.

Refer to the Abstractor Notes section in the Heme DB, Abstractor Notes for MDS. Myelodysplastic (disorder) syndrome is a NOS term. Usually when this diagnosis is made, the physician will conduct further tests to determine a more specific disease in the Myeloproliferative Neoplasms group. Other specific histologies include: refractory anemia with unilineage dysplasia, refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts, refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, refractory anemia with excess blasts, myelodysplastic syndrome with del(5q), childhood myelodysplastic syndrome. If a more specific disease is diagnosed, code to that specific neoplasm.

SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

20120013 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Should a 2011 diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis be accessioned as a reportable case if the patient had a disease free interval between the 2011 diagnosis and when the patient was initially diagnosed with Langerhans cell histiocytosis prior to 2010? See Discussion. The patient was diagnosed with Langerhans cell histiocytosis as a child when the disease was not reportable [9751/1]. The patient was disease free until a recurrence in 2011. Langerhans cell histiocytosis is considered reportable if diagnosed 1/1/2010 and later [9751/3]. The Heme Manual states this is a single primary, but the behavior has changed from borderline to malignant since the initial diagnosis.

For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

Do not accession the 2011 diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. In the Abstractor Notes section of the Heme DB is indicates this is reportable for cases diagnosed 2010 and later. However, this patient was initially diagnosed prior to 2010 when it was not considered a reportable disease process.

The histology code for Langerhans cell histiocytosis has not changed over time. The histology code for cases of Langerhans cell histiocytosis diagnosed prior to 2010 was also 9751 per the ICD-O-3. The only change since 2010 was in the behavior code for this disease. It changed from borderline [/1] to malignant [/3]. The current disease represents a recurrence of the previous Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Per the Multiple Primary rules, Rule M2, a single histology is a single primary. The original diagnosis was made before the disease was considered reportable; do not report the disease recurrence or progression as a new primary.

SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

20130127 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: When did smoldering myeloma become reportable?

For cases diagnosed 2010 and forward, access the Hematopoietic Database at http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph.

Smoldering multiple myeloma [9732/3] has always been a reportable neoplasm. Per the Abstractor Notes section in the Heme, smoldering multiple myeloma is a variant of multiple myeloma in which the diagnostic requirements for multiple myeloma are met, but there is no organ damage. The patient is usually asymptomatic.

Smoldering myeloma is listed under the Alternate Names section in the Heme DB for multiple myeloma [9732/3] to clarify that it is a reportable neoplasm.

Report all new diagnoses of smoldering multiple myeloma now. Registries are not required to spend time and effort to find these cases if they have not been reporting them in the past. However, report earlier earlier cases if encountered today while performing casefinding or chart review procedures.

SEER*Educate provides training on how to use the Heme Manual and DB. If you are unsure how to arrive at the answer in this SINQ question, refer to SEER*Educate to practice coding hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms. Review the step-by-step instructions provided for each case scenario to learn how to use the application and manual to arrive at the answer provided. https://educate.fhcrc.org/LandingPage.aspx.

20130119 Reportability--Heme & Lymphoid Neoplasms: Would this case be reportable? Patient with a myelodysplastic syndrome secondary to a copper deficiency. Myelodysplastic syndrome is a reportable disease. Document in the text that the MDS was due to a copper deficiency.
20091004 Reportability--Kidney: Is the donor or the recipient considered the reportable patient when a cyst removed from a pre-transplanted kidney is determined to be cancerous? See Discussion. A patient received a kidney from her son. The son's kidney had a cyst which was removed prior to the transplant and later determined to be renal cell ca. Who do we report, the donor or the recipient? The renal cell carcinoma should be reported for the donor. The cyst that was determined to be carcinoma was removed before the kidney was transplanted.
20061141 Reportability--Leukemia: Is the diagnosis "a minority abnormal T-cell population (2-3%) with phenotypic features of large granular lymphocyte leukemia cells" reportable if it is from a flow cytometry procedure performed on a non-diagnostic bone marrow biopsy specimen? See Discussion.

Pt had only a bone marrow Bx done at the hospital.

Bone marrow biopsy and aspirate:

Peripheral blood showing mild relative lymphocytosis and mild relative neutropenia.

Normocellular bone marrow (50%) with mild eosinophilia. No conclusive morphologic evidence of a neoplastic process.

Flow cytometry of the marrow shows a minority abnormal T-cell population (2-3%) with phenotypic features of large granular lymphocyte leukemia cells. PCR is positive for a clonal T-cell population. The significance of these findings is unclear.

COMMENT: Flow cytometry, PCR and morphologic correlation were performed at [names removed]. The significance of a minimal, clonal, large granulocyte leukemia population absent absolute lymphocytosis is unclear. Positive results for a T-cell receptor PCR study in the setting of mild leukopenia alone is reportedly relatively common and usually regarded as nonspecific. In essence, this could be characterized as a small, monoclonal T-cell proliferation of uncertain significance associated with mild leukopenia. Appropriate follow up is suggested.

For cases diagnosed prior to 1/1/2010:Do not report this type of case until there is a definitive reportable diagnosis. Based on the information provided, this case is not yet reportable. It could develop into a reportable case in the future.

For cases diagnosed 2010 forward, refer to the Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Neoplasm Case Reportability and Coding Manual and the Hematopoietic Database (Hematopoietic DB) provided by SEER on its website to research your question. If those resources do not adequately address your issue, submit a new question to SINQ.

20081076 Reportability--Lung: Is carcinoid tumorlet of the lung a reportable disease? See Discussion. The literature on this is rather ambiguous as to whether these tumorlets (defined as <0.5 cm) are benign, such as atypical hyperplasia, or actual carcinoid tumors. Carcinoid tumorlets are not reportable. The histology can be similar to typical carcinoids; however, they are <5 mm in diameter and are benign/nonreportable.
20051067 Reportability--Lung: Is sclerosing hemangioma of the lung with multiple regional lymph nodes metastases considered reportable? No, it is not reportable. According to the WHO Classification of Lung Tumours, sclerosing hemangioma "behaves in a clinically benign fashion...Reported cases with hilar or mediastinal lymph node involvement do not have a worse prognosis."
20061097 Reportability--Lymphoma: Is a lymphoma diagnosed on a bone marrow biopsy considered reportable if the cytogenetics evaluation performed does not confirm the malignancy? See Discussion.

Bone marrow Bx: Marginal zone lymphoma/leukemia. The morphology of the lymphoma/leukemia cells and the immunophenotypic characteristics identified by flow cytometry are consistent with marginal zone lymphoma/leukemia.

Addendum Report: Cytogenetic evaluation revealed a 46,XY male karyotype. This is the normal male chromosome karyotype. Based on the limits of this methodology, no evidence of hematologic malignancy was observed in this specimen.

For cases diagnosed prior to 1/1/2010:

Yes, this case is reportable. The cytogenetic evaluation cited in the addendum report does not disprove the bone marrow biopsy diagnosis.

For cases diagnosed 2010 forward, refer to the Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Neoplasm Case Reportability and Coding Manual and the Hematopoietic Database (Hematopoietic DB) provided by SEER on its website to research your question. If those resources do not adequately address your issue, submit a new question to SINQ.

20110040 Reportability--Melanoma: Is a pathology report with a final diagnosis stating only non-reportable terms, followed by a re-excision pathology report that indicates "no residual melanoma" considered reportable? See Discussion. Is a case reportable if the final diagnosis on an initial pathology report states a non-reportable term (e.g., evolving melanoma, early/evolving melanoma or melanocytic nevus) and followed by a subsequent re-excision pathology report stating there is "No residual melanoma"? There is no mention in the clinical history on the subsequent pathology report that the diagnosis was thought to be melanoma following the first procedure. The first mention of the reportable term was in the final diagnosis of the subsequent pathology report that stated "no residual melanoma."

No. This case is not reportable based on the information provided. "No residual melanoma" is not diagnostic of a reportable neoplasm.

We recommend that you try to obtain more information from the clinician/pathologist for this case due to the poor documentation. Check for any additional resection performed.